Cervical Mobility

Today we are going to go over how to improve the mobility in your neck. There are many joints in your neck and well, they really like to keep moving. When the joints of your neck stop moving well or really at all, this is when the symptoms can begin. These can range from tension headaches & decreased range of motion to radiation of pain &/or numbness/tingling down the neck & into the arm. All of which decrease the quality of your life in some capacity.

These exercises especially help our clients who are desk jockeys, overhead athletes, new mothers, teenagers and drivers. These types of patients are very prone to developing that upper cross syndrome pattern that we discussed last week. Doing a little bit each day, to help prevent chronic symptoms.

Mobility Exercise - Upper Traps → Start in a relaxed seated position, or even sitting upright in bed first thing in the morning. If you have the mobility in your shoulders, place one arm behind your back to lower & stabilize your shoulder blade. If you are lacking in shoulder mobility, either sit on your hand or grab the edge of your seat to lock down that shoulder blade. Now slowly lean your neck to the opposite ear. Don’t cheat by bringing your shoulder to your ear! Using the opposite hand grab the side of your head and help gently guide the head down towards the ear to deepen the stretch. Hold for 3 breath cycles, in through the nose & out through the mouth. Release and repeat 2-3x on each side.

Mobility Exercise - Levator Scapulae → Set up like you did for the upper trap stretch, up to the part where you lean to the opposite ear. Now remaining on that same side, turn your chin down to your chest so that you are looking down at the opposite knee. Using your opposite hand further the stretch by guiding the chin closer to chest. Hold for 3 breath cycles, in through the nose & out through the mouth. Release and repeat 2-3x on each side.

 Dr. Lundahl demonstrates upper trap mobility. 

Dr. Lundahl demonstrates upper trap mobility. 

 Dr. Lundahl demonstrates levator scapulae mobility. 

Dr. Lundahl demonstrates levator scapulae mobility.